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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Upper back pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Scalene muscles Levator scapula muscle Supraspinatus muscle Trapezius muscle Multifidus muscles Splenius

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Face and jaw pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Masseter muscle Lateral pterygoid muscle Medial pterygoid muscle Digastric muscle Trapezius muscle

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Eye and eyebrow pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Temporal muscle Masseter muscle Orbicularis oculi muscle (subscription required) Sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle (subscription

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Toothache

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Temporal muscle               Digastric muscle Masseter

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Anterior neck pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Digastric muscle (on subscription) Media pterygoid muscle (on subscription) Sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle (on

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Posterior neck pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Trapezius muscle Multifidus and semispinatus muscle Splenius muscle of the neck Levator

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Ear and temporomandibular joint pain

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Masseter muscle Sternocleidomastoid muscle Lateral pterygoid muscle Medial pterygoid muscle

Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Pain in the front (front) part of the head

Here is the list of muscles potentially responsible for these pains, a link can be selected for more details on a particular muscle: Occipito-frontal muscle Sternocleidomastoid muscle (subscription) Semispinatus muscle (subscription) Zygomaticus major muscle (subscription)

Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Pain in the temporal part of the head

A number of muscles in the neck and head can be responsible for pain referred to the temporal part of the head. Trapezius muscle (by subscription). Splenius muscle Sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle (on subscription). Temporal muscle Sub-occipital

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Pain in the back of the head

The following muscles may be responsible for pain in the back of the head: Trapezius muscle Semispinatus muscle Splenius muscle of the neck Suboccipital muscles Occipito-frontal muscle Sternocleidomastoid muscle Digastric muscle Temporal muscle

Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Vertex pain of muscular origin

Two muscles can be responsible for this isolated pain: Sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle (on subscription) Splenius capitis muscle

Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Torticollis: myofascial syndrome of the levator scapula muscle MEDECIN ABONNE

Anatomical reminder The levator scapula attaches above to the transverse processes of the first 4 cervical vertebrae and below to the superomedial angle of the scapula. Its role is: to elevate the medial aspect of

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Myofascial syndrome of the head and neck splenius MEDECIN

Anatomical reminder It is composed of an upper part, the splenius muscle of the head, and a lower part, the splenius muscle of the neck: They lie directly under the trapezius muscle. 1- semi-spinous of

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Guide to pain of myofascial origin

Occipito-frontal myofascial syndrome MEDECIN ABONNE

Anatomy of the occipitofrontalis muscle. This muscle is composed of an anterior frontal part and an occipital part (in red). They are attached to an aponeurosis which covers the skull (in yellow) and which slides

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Post operative chronic pain